7 Most Used Idioms in Russian | Learn Russian Language

7 Most Used Idioms in Russian | Learn Russian Language


Hello everyone! And welcome back to my
channel Ari Russian, where we continue to learn Russian language. And today we
are going to talk about seven Russian popular idioms, or common phrases that
native speakers often use in their everyday conversations. These phrases cannot be taken literally. You would not be able to deduce the meanings by studying and translating the particular words in the phrase, it will not make a
lot of sense. So there’s only one way for learners of Russian language to reach
the meaning of these expressions. This way is to remember exactly what they
mean. I know that sounds scary, and it’s not the easiest part for Russian
language learners, actually idioms give native speakers a lot of trouble, too.
However, you just imagine, how it can spice up your speech, and how great the
feeling is when you’re sure what you heard is really what it means. So today I
will introduce you to some Russian expressions that are commonly used by
natives in everyday life. If you are interested in learning Russian, you can
subscribe to my channel and turn on the notifications, so that you’ll not miss my
next videos. Are you ready? Let’s begin! The first expression is Делать из
мухи слона. The direct translation of this phrase is “To make an elephant out of
a fly”. This is a very common expression in Russian language. If someone Делает из
мухи слона, it means that he or she is greatly exaggerating and turning a
minor thing into a big problem. The authorship of this phrase is
unknown, some people think it takes its roots in ancient Greece, others think
it’s a Latin proverb. But this expression is very famous, and there are similar
idioms, existing in many other languages. For example, in English this is “To make a
mountain out of a molehill”. Let’s listen, how it sounds in a sentence.
Не делай из мухи слона! Не стоит расстраиваться только из-за того,
что вы пришли на концерт в одинаковых платьях! Не делай из мухи слона!
Не стоит расстраиваться только из-за того, что вы пришли на концерт в одинаковых платьях!
Expression number two. Заруби ceбe на носу.
It literally means “To make a notch on one’s nose”. By saying this we mean that
someone is better to remember something, and not just remember, but to understand
and memorize it. In my opinion, this expression usually doesn’t sound nice. It
sounds a little strictly like an order to get it through your head and bear in
mind. In the early times, “the nose” was used to name a tag that was carried with a
person, and inside this tag there were taken marks to count the amount of work
he made. So this idiom takes roots from there. And the example.
Только попробуй еще раз обмануть меня! Я тебя прощаю в первый и последний раз,
заруби себе это на носу! Только попробуй еще раз обмануть меня!
Я тебя прощаю в первый и последний раз, заруби себе это на носу!
Number three. Я тебе покажу, где раки зимуют.
This idiom is translated as “I will show you where crayfishes
spend the winter”. This is an abstract threat or a promise to punish cruelly
for something, to teach a lesson. In the old days crayfishes were considered as
something mysterious and were a delicacy, especially when caught in winter. Many
Russian landlords loved to enjoy fresh crayfish in winter, so they sent guilty
peasants to get crayfish from the ice water. But it was very hard to catch them
during this time of the year because the water was freezing. So, often after that a
person was seriously ill. That’s how the idiom appeared. So if people want to
seriously punish someone, they say: Покажу, где раки зимуют.
Example. Как он мог так со мной поступить! Взять и выдать мою идею за свою.
Ну я покажу ему, где раки зимуют! Как он мог так со мной поступить!
Взять и выдать мою идею за свою. Ну я покажу ему, где раки зимуют!
Number four. Вот, где собака зарыта. The translation of this phrase
is “That’s where the dog is buried!” If a person cannot solve a problem for a long
time, and after he suddenly says: “Вот, где собака зарыта!”, it means that a person got
to the bottom of the truth. He or she got to the root of the problem, discovering
the reason why something happened. There is a version that the phrase originally
appeared in the vocabulary of treasure hunters. They feared the evil spirits
guarding the treasures and called them (the treasures) “black dogs”, in order to mislead the
spirits. In the language of treasure hunters, the expression means “This is
where the treasure is buried”. And here’s the example.
Так вот, оказывается, где собака зарыта! Спасибо тебе, а то я так долго пыталась
подключить этот принтер к компьютеру! Так вот, оказывается, где собака зарыта!
Спасибо тебе, а то я так долго пыталась подключить этот принтер к компьютеру!
Expression number five. Ни пуха, ни пера. This expression literally means: “Neither
for nor feather”. And in Russian this is a way to wish someone good luck. The idea
behind it is similar to the phrase “break a leg”. The origins of this expression
are in hunting. Ancient people believed that the spirits
of the forest harm the hunter for animals and birds. To prevent this from
happening, they usually told that a person does
not go to the forest for feathers and wished a bad hunting. They hoped that
wishing someone bad luck will make them have good luck.
Nowadays this expression is used to wish someone a successful job interview
or an exam. And don’t forget to response to this phrase, the required
response is К чёрту! (To hell or to the devil). But it’s better than it sounds.
Example. “Ни пуха, ни пера!” – сказала мама, провожая дочь на экзамен.
“Ни пуха, ни пера!” – сказала мама, провожая дочь на экзамен. Number six. Кот наплакал.
The direct translation of this phrase is “cat wept”, it means “very little” or
“don’t have at all”. We use this phrase, when we want to emphasize that something has a
small quantity, or in a limited number. In the past, people have paid attention
to the fact that many animals are able to cry. Including cows, horses, dogs and so on.
But no one has ever seen how the cat’s tears run out. So that is how this
expression appeared. “Cat wept” is a very small amount, or a complete lack of
something. Example. Я бы пошла с тобой по магазинам,
но у меня денег в кармане – кот наплакал. Я бы пошла с тобой по магазинам,
но у меня денег в кармане – кот наплакал. Number seven. Первый блин всегда комом.
This expression literally means: “The first pancake is always a mess”. You know
that Russians love блины or pancakes. And we even have a traditional annual
festival Maslenitsa in the end of February, when we eat a lot of pancakes,
celebrate the end of winter and welcoming spring. A long time ago in
Russia during this festival, there was a tradition to feed hungry bears with
first pancakes, because that time they just woke up from winter sleep. So this
proverb appeared: “The first pancake to the bears”. Over time, many people began to
say “The first pancake is a mess”, because these two words – bear and mess – sounded
similar before. Nowadays, this expression “Первый блин всегда комом” means that, as a
rule, we fail when we try to do something unfamiliar to us for the
first time, it’s rarely lucky at the beginning, but we shouldn’t ever give up –
this is only the first pancake! And we can get lucky with the second and
third pancake. Of course, this is not only about making pancakes, here we mean any
kind of business or knowledge where the skill comes gradually. Example.
Не расстраивайся, первый блин всегда комом! В следующий раз ты лучше подготовишься к докладу.
201
00:09:40,190 –>00:09:46,610
Не расстраивайся, первый блин всегда комом! В следующий раз ты лучше подготовишься к докладу.
So that’s it for today, and today we talked about popular and
interesting Russian idioms, their meanings and origins. Now you can try to add some of
these phrases to your vocabulary and spice up the conversation.
Do you have any favorite idioms? Could you please share them in the comments below?
I hope this video was interesting for you. And if you liked it, you can
subscribe to my channel and press the notification button, so that you will
know when will be my next video. See you! Bye-bye!

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