[Eng]Korean Class/How to read Hangul, Korean characters(1A-1)한국어 수업/Korean lessons/Korean teacher

[Eng]Korean Class/How to read Hangul, Korean characters(1A-1)한국어 수업/Korean lessons/Korean teacher


Hello everyone, welcome to my Korean class! I’m Korean teacher Anne. In order to learn Korean, it is crucial to begin with Hangul – the writing system of Korean. Hangul is very logical and organized, so 2 hours is all you need to be able to read Hangul. Today, we will be learning about vowels (‘moeum’).
Let’s begin with the composition of Hangul. Hangul is made up of these vowels you see here, as shown in this row; and the consonants (‘jaeum’) shown in this column. A syllable in Korean must always contain at least one vowel and one consonant. It’s possible to have more than one consonant per syllable, but it’s important to note that there should only be one vowel per syllable. The rule is that for each syllable, there should only be one vowel and it should always begin with a consonant. So when you write syllables, you should always begin with a consonant. But if you want to pronounce a word that has a vowel sound, this consonant you see here should be used. This consonant’s is called ‘ㅇ’, and you will have a chance to learn it at a later stage. So if you write this consonant first and followed by a vowel, this will allow you to pronounce the vowel sound only. To recap: Korean syllables always begin with a consonant, and each syllable has one vowel only. Those are the two important points to remember. Today we will start with 10 basic vowels. So the vowels you see here looks like these. But where possible, you must always write the consonant first. Let me pronounce the sound of these vowels here. The first vowel is 아. 아. 아 That’s how it sounds. I understand that this pronunciation is present in most languages, so you should have no trouble pronouncing this vowel. 아. 아. Next one we have – you may or may not have it in your native language. Take a good look of the shape of my lips and try to follow me. 어. 어. 어
Yes, did you manage? Let’s give it another go. 어. 어. Comparing these two vowels can make things a bit more clearer. 아 어 아 어 – they sound like this. Then the third vowel we have, requires you to have your lips to make a small circular shape. 오 오 오 Shall we compare the two vowels? 어 오 어 오 That’s how those two pronunciations differ.
Next we have the fourth one – 우 우 우 It’s pronounced like this – not tough right? Then the fifth one, I haven’t seen that many students who had this vowel sound in their native language during the past 20 years I’ve been teaching Korean. So this could be a pretty difficult pronunciation. Please listen carefully and try to imitate me.
Your lips should look like this. Then let’s try it.
으 으 으 I know it’s not easy, but let’s try once more.
으 으 The last one we have is much easier. 이 이 이 Let us recap the six vowels we just went through. 아 어 오 우 으 이 Yes, good job! Now, we have these 4 additional vowels here. You should be able to get through these very easily. These two are very similar. The only difference is that this one has one stoke,
while this one has two strokes. This additional stroke works like a ‘y’ in English,
so it’s equivalent of adding ‘y’ to the pronunciation 아 So we have 야 야 야
It’s pronounced like this. Do you remember this? 어 어 어 So if you add a ‘y’, it would be pronounced 여 여 여. Do you remember this one? 오 오 오 Adding a ‘y’ would make it 요 요 요 You can pronounce it like so. Shall we do one more? 우 우 우 Adding a ‘y’ will turn the pronunciation into 유 유 유 We just finished going through the most basic 10 vowels. Let’s put it to practice once more, then we’ll move onto practicing vocabularies. Let’s begin. 아 야 어 여 오 요 우 유 으 이. That’s how they should be pronounced. Then let’s practice the words on page 32 of your textbook. If you do not have the book, you may refer to what’s shown on the screen and follow along. First we have 오 오 오 These words all have a meaning, but for now you don’t have to remember them. Please focus on the pronunciation of these words for now. 오 오 오 Then we have 이 이 이 Yes, the second sound is pronounced 이 이 이 This vowel may sound like, or like this 이 이 이 (longer). Thirdly, we have 아우 아우 아우 Next we have 아이 아이 아이 The fifth one is pronounced 오이 오이 오이 Good job! Since we learned how to read vowels, let’s also put writing of these vowels to practice. Writing these are easy! The most important rule to remember when writing in Korean, is that you should always write from left to right; and top to bottom. No matter what, from left to right; top to bottom. This is the golden rule of writing Korean. Let’s give it a try. 아 아 어 어 오 오 우 우 으 으 이 이 Let’s also try writing the remaining four vowels. 야 야 여 여 요 요 유 유 We just finished learning how to pronounce and write the 10 vowels. In our next lesson, we will learn about the 14 consonants shown here. That’s all for today. This was Korean teacher Anne. Thank you.

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